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In Culture Tours | Manjaree Trail

Look, taste, touch, feel... immerse yourself in culture.

Journey along part of an ancient Aboriginal trade route, where for thousands of years food was hunted and foraged, great gatherings were conducted, stories were shared and marriages were arranged. Explore how the Nyoongar people cared for and thrived on this country for millennia and how colonisation irrevocably changed the lives of Nyoongar people.

The area where In Culture conduct their tour is called Manjaree in the local Whadjuk dialect, the name given to a sort of festival or celebration where clans of the Noongar Nation from Western Australia’s South West would meet and trade with each other.

MAP OF THE MANJAREE TRAIL

In Culture Walking Tour Highlights

  • 6 SEASONS: The Nyoongar lived by the 6 seasons. These seasons were determined by seasonal indicators like changes in the weather, flowers blossoming or animals waking from hibernation. These changes indicated when certain foods were right for hunting and gathering or when it was time to move to the coast during the hot time. Learn about the 6 seasons and how to recognise the indicators.

     
  • NYOONGAR CULTURE: Learn about the traditional lives of the Nyoongar people, the social structures, spiritual beliefs, cultural lore and Dreaming stories of the creation beings. Explore the tools and implements and how they were used to care for country and live sustainably for over 40,000 years.

     
  • ROUNDHOUSE: The Roundhouse was used as holding cells for Aboriginal men waiting to be transported to Wadjemup (Rottnest), which served as a prison for over 3500 male Aboriginals, many of whom were warriors and leaders. Officially closing in 1904, it is reported that 369 Aboriginal prisoners died between 1838 and 1931.

     
  • WHALING STATION: Traditionally the stranding of whales was seen as a time of celebration, bringing clans together for large gatherings, feasting and merriment. The establishment of the whaling station at Bather Bay saw whale scraps regularly discarded near the tryworks. So the bay became an important place for local Aboriginal people during the first two decades of settlement.

     
  • NATIVE SCHOOL: The old Port Office, or Harbour Master’s office (located at about the present position of the railway crossing at the end of Marine Terrace) was used in 1841 to establish a Native School. Eighteen Aboriginal children were taught by a Mrs Robertson.

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